Student Categories

Greg
Dick

Greg is the Director of Educational Outreach at Canada’s Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics. Greg’s team delivers outreach programming across Canada and internationally that includes coast to coast television broadcasts, large scale science festivals, and an educational program that reaches one million students each year. Greg is as an Advisory Board member on Canada’s Science and Technology Awareness Network, the Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame Selection Committee and on the Laurier Center for Women in Science as part of his commitment to scientific outreach.

Prior to leading the Outreach team, Greg was the Science Chair at Galt Collegiate Institute where he taught high school physics for 16 years. A recipient of the Barraday Teacher of Excellence Award, Greg led the development of innovative provincial curriculum and championed changes designed to provide authentic learning opportunities for students. Greg has authored textbooks, educational resources, courses and curriculum. He is a passionate advocate of scientific literacy in Canada and regularly shares his experience and expertise internationally, including keynote presentations to educators and outreach experts in Europe, Asia, and Africa.

Yuni
Hadi

Yuni Hadi is a film producer, author and curator specializing in the management of film and media projects. She has spent a large part of her career creating platforms to launch the works of emerging film talents and strongly believes in setting the foundation for film literacy at a young age and creating the bridge for artists and audiences. In 2013, Yuni published and edited the book Behind the Camera and co-produced the film Ilo Ilo, winner of the Camera d’Or at the 66th Cannes Film Festival and Best Feature Film at 50th Golden Horse Awards. Yuni holds an M.A in Arts Management from LASALLE College of the Arts and is a Partner of Objectifs Centre for Photography & Filmmaking. She is currently Executive Director of the Singapore International Film Festival.

Yuni’s ties with the Festival and the Singapore arts scene go back a long way – in 2009, she was Festival Director of the 22nd instalment of SGIFF after serving as Festival Manager in 2008. She is also co-founder of the independent film distribution label Objectifs Films and was a senior programmer at The Substation, where she created milestone film programmes, and was Editor of its arts publication Substance. In 2003, she co-founded the Fly By Night Video Challenge with filmmaker Tan Pin Pin, and in 2009, initiated the Singapore Short Film Awards with filmmaker Chai Yeewei. From 2010 to 2012, she curated the dance film section of the Singapore Arts Festival, and was named one of Female Magazine’s “50 Most Inspiring Women” in 2010. In 2011, she was featured as one of the “Creative SHEroes, InsideOut” in Singapore, curated by Kelley Cheng with TEDxSingapore.Photo: Rebecca Toh

Dagomir
Kaszlikowski

Dagomir researches the foundations of quantum theory, investigating issues such as contextuality in quantum theory and whether there exists a quantum-classical boundary. He is a Principal Investigator and Associate Professor at the Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore. Dagomir is also a movie buff and filmmaker. Check out this video he made about one of his scientific papers.

Derek
Muller

Derek is a science communicator, filmmaker and television presenter. He is best known for creating the YouTube channel Veritasium, the science video blog from atoms to astrophysics. Derek also appears as a television presenter on the Australian television program Catalyst.

Derek has a BSc in Engineering Physics at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada and a PhD in Physics Education Research at the University of Sydney. Derek studied how to design multimedia to teach physics effectively. One of his major findings is that addressing misconceptions first is often essential to engage the audience and promote conceptual change. He puts this research into practice as a presenter for Catalyst and as director of Veritasium. Derek has published in several international science education journals and presented at numerous education conferences worldwide. He also teaches physics at the high school and university levels.

Jennifer
Ouellette

Jennifer is the author of four popular science books: Me, Myself, and Why: Searching for the Science of Self (2014); The Calculus Diaries: How Math Can Help You Lose Weight, Win in Vegas, and Survive a Zombie Apocalypse (2010); The Physics of the Buffyverse (2007); and Black Bodies and Quantum Cats: Tales from the Annals of Physics (2006), all published by Penguin. She also edited The Best Online Science Writing 2012 (Scientific American Books/FSG).

Her work has appeared in the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times Book Review, Discover, Slate, Salon, Smithsonian, Mental Floss, Pacific Standard, and New Scientist, among other venues. She maintains a blog called Cocktail Party Physics at Scientific American, featuring her avatar altar-ego/evil twin, Jen-Luc Piquant – also her Twitter handle -- and has also blogged for Discovery News (2008-2012).

Ouellette is a co-host for Virtually Speaking Science, a weekly conversation with a prominent scientist or science writer hosted by the Exploratorium in Second Life and aired as a podcast by Blog Talk Radio. She holds a black belt in jujitsu, and lives in Los Angeles, California, with her husband, Caltech physicist Sean (M.) Carroll.

Kian Tiong
Pang

Kian Tiong researches, designs and develops exhibitions for the Science Centre Singapore. He also sometimes teaches labs, classes and workshops at the Science Centre, and he runs the Science in the Cafe series of public talks. His previous projects include research and development for a laser-surgical ophthalmic device to diagnose and treat age-related macular degeneration, on which he wrote two patents.

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C is for ... Computing

The rules of the quantum world mean that we can process information much faster than is possible using the computers we use now.

A is for ... Alice and Bob

In quantum experiments, these are the names traditionally given to the people transmitting and receiving information. In quantum cryptography, an eavesdropper called Eve tries to intercept the information.

N is for ... Nonlocality

When two quantum particles are entangled, it can also be said they are “nonlocal”: their physical proximity does not affect the way their quantum states are linked.

J is for ... Josephson Junction

This is a narrow constriction in a ring of superconductor. Current can only move around the ring because of quantum laws; the apparatus provides a neat way to investigate the properties of quantum mechanics.

M is for ... Multiverse

Our most successful theories of cosmology suggest that our universe is one of many universes that bubble off from one another. It’s not clear whether it will ever be possible to detect these other universes.

D is for ... Decoherence

Unless it is carefully isolated, a quantum system will “leak” information into its surroundings. This can destroy delicate states such as superposition and entanglement.

U is for ... Uncertainty Principle

One of the most famous ideas in science, this declares that it is impossible to know all the physical attributes of a quantum particle or system simultaneously.

I is for ... Interferometer

Some of the strangest characteristics of quantum theory can be demonstrated by firing a photon into an interferometer: the device’s output is a pattern that can only be explained by the photon passing simultaneously through two widely-separated slits.

R is for ... Radioactivity

The atoms of a radioactive substance break apart, emitting particles. It is impossible to predict when the next particle will be emitted as it happens at random. All we can do is give the probability that any particular atom will have decayed by a given time.

X is for ... X-ray

In 1923 Arthur Compton shone X-rays onto a block of graphite and found that they bounced off with their energy reduced exactly as would be expected if they were composed of particles colliding with electrons in the graphite. This was the first indication of radiation’s particle-like nature.

Y is for ... Young's Double Slit Experiment

In 1801, Thomas Young proved light was a wave, and overthrew Newton’s idea that light was a “corpuscle”.

I is for ... Information

Many researchers working in quantum theory believe that information is the most fundamental building block of reality.

V is for ... Virtual particles

Quantum theory’s uncertainty principle says that since not even empty space can have zero energy, the universe is fizzing with particle-antiparticle pairs that pop in and out of existence. These “virtual” particles are the source of Hawking radiation.

W is for ... Wave-particle duality

It is possible to describe an atom, an electron, or a photon as either a wave or a particle. In reality, they are both: a wave and a particle.

G is for ... Gluon

These elementary particles hold together the quarks that lie at the heart of matter.

A is for ... Atom

This is the basic building block of matter that creates the world of chemical elements – although it is made up of more fundamental particles.

U is for ... Universe

To many researchers, the universe behaves like a gigantic quantum computer that is busy processing all the information it contains.

G is for ... Gravity

Our best theory of gravity no longer belongs to Isaac Newton. It’s Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. There’s just one problem: it is incompatible with quantum theory. The effort to tie the two together provides the greatest challenge to physics in the 21st century.

H is for ... Hidden Variables

One school of thought says that the strangeness of quantum theory can be put down to a lack of information; if we could find the “hidden variables” the mysteries would all go away.

F is for ... Free Will

Ideas at the heart of quantum theory, to do with randomness and the character of the molecules that make up the physical matter of our brains, lead some researchers to suggest humans can’t have free will.

Z is for ... Zero-point energy

Even at absolute zero, the lowest temperature possible, nothing has zero energy. In these conditions, particles and fields are in their lowest energy state, with an energy proportional to Planck’s constant.

Q is for ... Quantum biology

A new and growing field that explores whether many biological processes depend on uniquely quantum processes to work. Under particular scrutiny at the moment are photosynthesis, smell and the navigation of migratory birds.

R is for ... Randomness

Unpredictability lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. It bothered Einstein, but it also bothers the Dalai Lama.

L is for ... Light

We used to believe light was a wave, then we discovered it had the properties of a particle that we call a photon. Now we know it, like all elementary quantum objects, is both a wave and a particle!

B is for ... Bell's Theorem

In 1964, John Bell came up with a way of testing whether quantum theory was a true reflection of reality. In 1982, the results came in – and the world has never been the same since!

Q is for ... Qubit

One quantum bit of information is known as a qubit (pronounced Q-bit). The ability of quantum particles to exist in many different states at once means a single quantum object can represent multiple qubits at once, opening up the possibility of extremely fast information processing.

B is for ... Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)

At extremely low temperatures, quantum rules mean that atoms can come together and behave as if they are one giant super-atom.

S is for ... Superposition

Quantum objects can exist in two or more states at once: an electron in superposition, for example, can simultaneously move clockwise and anticlockwise around a ring-shaped conductor.

P is for ... Planck's Constant

This is one of the universal constants of nature, and relates the energy of a single quantum of radiation to its frequency. It is central to quantum theory and appears in many important formulae, including the Schrödinger Equation.

E is for ... Entanglement

When two quantum objects interact, the information they contain becomes shared. This can result in a kind of link between them, where an action performed on one will affect the outcome of an action performed on the other. This “entanglement” applies even if the two particles are half a universe apart.

R is for ... Reality

Since the predictions of quantum theory have been right in every experiment ever done, many researchers think it is the best guide we have to the nature of reality. Unfortunately, that still leaves room for plenty of ideas about what reality really is!

W is for ... Wavefunction

The mathematics of quantum theory associates each quantum object with a wavefunction that appears in the Schrödinger equation and gives the probability of finding it in any given state.

C is for ... Cryptography

People have been hiding information in messages for millennia, but the quantum world provides a whole new way to do it.

T is for ... Teleportation

Quantum tricks allow a particle to be transported from one location to another without passing through the intervening space – or that’s how it appears. The reality is that the process is more like faxing, where the information held by one particle is written onto a distant particle.

S is for ... Schrödinger’s Cat

A hypothetical experiment in which a cat kept in a closed box can be alive and dead at the same time – as long as nobody lifts the lid to take a look.

L is for ... Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

At CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, this machine is smashing apart particles in order to discover their constituent parts and the quantum laws that govern their behaviour.

P is for ... Probability

Quantum mechanics is a probabilistic theory: it does not give definite answers, but only the probability that an experiment will come up with a particular answer. This was the source of Einstein’s objection that God “does not play dice” with the universe.

O is for ... Objective reality

Niels Bohr, one of the founding fathers of quantum physics, said there is no such thing as objective reality. All we can talk about, he said, is the results of measurements we make.

K is for ... Kaon

These are particles that carry a quantum property called strangeness. Some fundamental particles have the property known as charm!

D is for ... Dice

Albert Einstein decided quantum theory couldn’t be right because its reliance on probability means everything is a result of chance. “God doesn’t play dice with the world,” he said.

T is for ... Tunnelling

This happens when quantum objects “borrow” energy in order to bypass an obstacle such as a gap in an electrical circuit. It is possible thanks to the uncertainty principle, and enables quantum particles to do things other particles can’t.

M is for ... Many Worlds Theory

Some researchers think the best way to explain the strange characteristics of the quantum world is to allow that each quantum event creates a new universe.

H is for ... Hawking Radiation

In 1975, Stephen Hawking showed that the principles of quantum mechanics would mean that a black hole emits a slow stream of particles and would eventually evaporate.

A is for ... Act of observation

Some people believe this changes everything in the quantum world, even bringing things into existence.

S is for ... Schrödinger Equation

This is the central equation of quantum theory, and describes how any quantum system will behave, and how its observable qualities are likely to manifest in an experiment.

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